Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Quince, Raspberry, and Meyer Lemon Marmalade

I'm not a marmalade on toast kind of girl. Now, marmalade on cheese is a whole other story! Especially quince marmalade. I only just discovered the joy of quince when I was able to get a few and make membrillo last year. They are nearly impossible to find in Fairbanks, but I was able to order a few in my produce box. The problem is that they work out to $2.50 a piece. So, a large batch of quince jam isn't really something I can afford.
That is why I was thrilled to find this recipe for Quince and Raspberry Marmalade in Elizabeth Field's new book. I have to admit that I originally bought the book because I thought the photography was gorgeous. Once I started really looking at it I realized it was more than just an eye catching cover. There is some really great information including little tidbits about the history of marmalade, and a whole section in the back with recipes for using marmalade. Recipes are perfect for someone who likes other vehicles for marmalade besides toast.
I made some subtle changes to the original recipe, mostly bumping up the lemon juice and adding a little meyer lemon zest as well. I was afraid the original might be too sweet without it. If for no other reason, I think you should make this marmalade for the smell alone.  I didn't process one of my jars, primarily because I had plans to stick my spoon in it as soon as it had cooled enough that I wouldn't scorch my tongue. Every time I walk past that jar I have to open the lid and smell it. It is not only marmalade, but aromatherapy too.
This one set up a little hard for me, but I am candy thermometer challenged. Can anyone recommend a good one? I have now purchase three duds in a row.  It made me think that this would be great poured into molds and kept in the fridge for holiday cheese platters. Just pop the whole thing out on a plate and use a butter knife to cut off slices like membrillo. However you serve it I hope you enjoy, even if it is on toast!

Quince, Raspberry, and Meyer Lemon Marmalade
Amazon.com
adapted from Marmalade by Elizabeth Field

4 large quinces
2 Meyer lemons
4 cups sugar
3 cups raspberries, pureed in a food mill or rubbed through a fine mesh sieve to remove the seeds.

Peel, quarter, core, and seed the quinces. Slice thin.
Place the sliced quinces in a large, heavy bottomed pan and cover with water by about 1/2 inch. I used my 5/12 quart dutch oven and about 5 cups of water. Add juice from both Meyer lemons and bring to a boil, then reduce to a low simmer. Thinly slice the peel from one Meyer lemon. There were no seeds attached to the skin after I juiced it, so I just sliced the whole thing including pith and remaining interior membrane. Add to the pot once it comes to a simmer. Leave pot uncovered and simmer for about 1 1/2 hours. If it looks like your mixture is drying out add a little more water.  The quinces should be very soft, then add the sugar and stir to dissolve. Add the pureed raspberries. Raise the heat to medium high, stirring frequently with a wooden spoon and scraping the bottom to prevent scorching. Once mixture begins to sputter, stir constantly until it reaches 220 degrees Fahrenheit on a candy thermometer, or until desired consistency is achieved.  I ended up with about 3 1/2 cups of marmalade. Pour into hot, sterilized canning jars, or ramekins if storing in the refrigerator. Canned marmalade will need 1/4 inch of head space, be properly sealed, and  processed in a hot water bath for 5 minutes. Store in a cool, dark place.

16 comments:

  1. I wonder if the extra firmness was the addition of the meyer lemon (more pectin) to an already pectin rich fruit (quince)? I've made plenty of membrillo and marmalade, but never 'mixed' them. Both of them have always set pretty firmly for me and I've never used a thermometer for either (I used the cold plate test for marmalade and just winged the membrillo). This looks really good, altho' I think I may do a mash up of the recipe and see what cranberries will do instead of raspberries...

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    1. Yes, I do think the lemon played into. I do like a slightly firm marmalade though. I think what really sent it over the edge was the extra cooking time. Even after sitting in the fridge it is still spreadable though, which makes it perfect in my opinion, it will hold its shape for cheese, but can still be spread on an english muffin.

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  2. I love the combination of flavors. Unlike Alaska, quince are easy to find here in San Diego. I often see them at the local Arabic produce store. I've been thinking about making membrillo but this sounds pretty good too. Can't wait to try it! :)

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    1. They are both really good. I'm thinking about adapting my membrillo recipe to include raspberries now. The combination really is outstanding.

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  3. Are all three ingredients available at the same time? It sounds lovely but here I think raspberries are a little earlier in the season.

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    1. I always pick a ton of raspberries in the summertime and freeze them. They are my favorite, so I make sure I have them year round.

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  4. Your cheese platter look so everly tempting!

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  5. What a great marmalade...I'd never thought to add marmalade to a cheese plate, but this sounds delicious...love the quince. And what fantastic color!

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  6. i'm rather neutral about marmalade, if it's available i'll eat it but it's not something that i seek out. i've also never tried quince before!

    your photos in this post are beautiful, kinda moody and lovely.

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    1. i just read that there was an earthquake in alaska yesterday/last night. i only just read your blog this AM and i remembered that you're from there. i hope you & yours are ok!

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    2. Thank you for your kind words and your thoughtfulness about the earthquake. We are in Fairbanks, so a long way away from Anchorage. Although it was a fairly large quake there was no major damage and everyone in Anchorage was fine too.

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  7. Thank you for submitting this to the DMBLGIT Nicole, love the picture. How I wish I have the marmalade book now! Difficult to get quince here, but if I do, I know which recipe to try now:-)

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    1. Thank you Jehanne. I'm really excited about my first entry. That Marmalade book is great, I highly recommend it.

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  8. Airport Safeway had quince this year, just before Thanksgiving.

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